bull – Wiktionary

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bull - Wiktionary

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Center English bole, bul, bule, from a conflation of Outdated English bula (bull, steer) and Outdated Norse boli, each from Proto-Germanic *bulô (bull), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰl̥no-, from *bʰel- (to blow, swell up). Cognate with West Frisian bolle, Dutch bul, German Low German Bull, German Bulle, Swedish bulla; additionally Outdated Irish ball (limb), Latin follis (bellows, leather-based bag), Thracian βόλινθος (vólinthos, wild bull), Albanian buall (buffalo) or associated bolle (testicles), Historic Greek φαλλός (phallós, penis).

Noun[edit]

bull (countable and uncountable, plural bulls)

  1. Any male of domesticated cattle or oxen.
    1. Particularly, one that’s uncastrated.
  2. A male of domesticated cattle or oxen of any age.
  3. Any grownup male bovine.
  4. An grownup male of sure massive mammals, resembling whales, elephants, camels and seals.
  5. A big, robust man.
  6. (finance) An investor who buys (commodities or securities) in anticipation of an increase in costs.
  7. (slang) A policeman.
    • The Bat—they referred to as him the Bat. []. He’d by no means been in stir, the bulls had by no means mugged him, he did not run with a mob, he performed a lone hand, and fenced his stuff in order that even the fence could not swear he knew his face.
    1. (US) Particularly, a policeman employed in a railroad yard.
  8. (Britain, historic, out of date slang) A crown coin; its worth, 5 shillings.
    • 1859, J.C. Hotten, A Dictionary of Fashionable Slang, Cant, and Vulgar Phrases
      Half-a-crown is named an alderman, half a bull, half a tusheroon, and a madza caroon; while a crown piece, or 5 shillings, could also be referred to as both a bull, or a caroon, or a cartwheel, or a coachwheel, or a thick-un, or a tusheroon.
  9. (Britain) Clipping of bullseye.
    1. (navy, firearms) The central portion of a goal, contained in the inside and magpie.
  10. (Philadelphia, slang) A person.
  11. (uncountable, casual, euphemistic, slang) Clipping of bullshit.
  12. A person who has intercourse with one other man’s spouse or girlfriend with the consent of each.
  13. (out of date) A drink made by pouring water right into a cask that beforehand held liquor.
Synonyms[edit]
Antonyms[edit]
  • (finance: investor who sells in anticipation of a fall in costs): bear
Coordinate phrases[edit]
Derived phrases[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations under should be checked and inserted above into the suitable translation tables, eradicating any numbers. Numbers don’t essentially match these in definitions. See directions at Wiktionary:Entry format § Translations.

Adjective[edit]

bull (not comparable)

  1. Giant and robust, like a bull.
  2. (of enormous mammals) grownup male

    a bull elephant

    Synonym: male
    Antonym: feminine
  3. (finance) Of a market by which costs are rising (evaluate bear)
    Antonym: bear
  4. silly
    Synonym: silly
Derived[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Shortened from bullshit

Verb[edit]

bull (third-person singular easy current bulls, current participle bulling, easy previous and previous participle bulled)

  1. (intransitive) To power oneself (in a selected route).
    He bulled his manner in.
  2. (intransitive) To lie, to inform untruths.
  3. (intransitive) To be in warmth; to manifest sexual want as cows do.
  4. (Britain, navy) To shine boots to a excessive shine.
  5. (finance, transitive) To endeavour to boost the market worth of.
    to bull railroad bonds
  6. (finance, transitive) To endeavour to boost costs in.
    to bull the market
Translations[edit]

Derived phrases[edit]

(phrases derived from the adj., noun, or verb bull (etymology 1)):

Etymology 3[edit]

Center English bulle, from Outdated French bulle, from Latin bulla, from Gaulish. Doublet of bull (bubble).

Noun[edit]

bull (plural bulls)

  1. A papal bull, an official doc or edict from the Pope.
  2. A seal affixed to a doc, particularly a doc from the Pope.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

bull (third-person singular easy current bulls, current participle bulling, easy previous and previous participle bulled)

  1. (dated, 17th century) to publish in a Papal bull

Etymology 4[edit]

Center English bull (falsehood), of unknown origin. Presumably associated to Outdated French boul, boule, bole (fraud, deceit, trickery). Popularly related to bullshit.

Noun[edit]

bull (uncountable)

  1. A lie.
  2. (euphemistic, casual) Nonsense.
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

bull (third-person singular easy current bulls, current participle bulling, easy previous and previous participle bulled)

  1. To mock; to cheat.

Etymology 5[edit]

Outdated French boule (ball), from Latin bulla (spherical swelling), of Gaulish origin. Doublet of bull (papal bull).

Noun[edit]

bull (plural bulls)

  1. (16th century, out of date) A bubble.

Catalan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From bullir.

Noun[edit]

bull m (plural bulls)

  1. boiling
  2. effervescence

Verb[edit]

bull

  1. third-person singular current indicative type of bullir
  2. second-person singular crucial type of bullir

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin botulus (sausage).

Noun[edit]

bull m (plural bulls)

  1. A kind of pork sausage.

Associated phrases[edit]

Additional studying[edit]


Cimbrian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Lowered type of bóol (nicely).

Adverb[edit]

bull (comparative péssor, superlative dar péste)

  1. (Sette Comuni) nicely

    Iime bull hölfasto, miar web, sbaar?He is serving to you nicely, however not me, proper?

References[edit]

  • “bull” in Martalar, Umberto Martello; Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st version, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo

Etymology[edit]

From a clipped type of French bulldozer, from American English bulldozer.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bull m (plural bulls)

  1. (building) bulldozer

Synonyms[edit]


Icelandic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bull n (genitive singular bulls, no plural)

  1. nonsense, gibberish

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Associated phrases[edit]

  • bulla (to speak nonsense, to boil)

Westrobothnian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Outdated Norse bolli, from Proto-Germanic *bullô.

Noun[edit]

bull m

  1. picket bowl, lathed vessel, massive bowl

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *bullǭ.

Noun[edit]

bull f

  1. loaf
Derived phrases[edit]

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