fire – Wiktionary

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fire - Wiktionary

English[edit]

The fireplace of a stationary minigun (7)

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Center English fier, from Outdated English fȳr (fireplace), from Proto-West Germanic *fuir, from *fuïr, a regularised type of Proto-Germanic *fōr (fireplace) (examine Saterland Frisian Fjuur, West Frisian fjoer, Dutch vuur, Low German Füer, German Feuer, Danish fyr), finally from Proto-Indo-European *péh₂wr̥.

Evaluate Hittite 𒉺𒄴𒄯 (paḫḫur), Umbrian pir, Tocharian A/B por/puwar, Czech pýř (sizzling ashes), Historical Greek πῦρ (pûr, fireplace), and Armenian հուր (hur, fireplace)). This was an inanimate noun whose animate counterpart was Proto-Indo-European *h₁n̥gʷnis (see ignite). Cognate to pyre.

Various types[edit]

Noun[edit]

fireplace (countable and uncountable, plural fires)

  1. (uncountable) A (normally self-sustaining) chemical response involving the bonding of oxygen with carbon or different gasoline, with the manufacturing of warmth and the presence of flame or smouldering.
  2. (countable) An occasion of this chemical response, particularly when deliberately created and maintained in a selected location to a helpful finish (similar to a campfire or a fireplace fireplace).

    We sat in regards to the fireplace singing songs and telling tales.

    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 8, in Mr. Pratt’s Sufferers:

      We toted within the wooden and obtained the fireplace going good and cozy. Lord James nonetheless set in one of many chairs and Applegate had cabbaged the opposite and was hugging the range.

  3. (countable) The prevalence, typically unintended, of fireside in a sure place, inflicting harm and hazard.

    There was a fireplace on the college final night time and the entire place burned down.

    Throughout sizzling and dry summers many fires in forests are attributable to regardlessly discarded cigarette butts.

    • 2020 January 1, Bernard Lagan, “1000’s flee to seashores because the flames shut in”, in The Occasions, quantity 73,044, web page 24:

      Efforts to struggle the fires in New South Wales and Victoria have been hampered as massive fires converged and created their very own violent climate techniques. The fireplace created dry lightning storms so extreme that planes needed to be grounded.

  4. (uncountable, alchemy, philosophy) The aforementioned chemical response of burning, thought of one of many Classical parts or primary parts of alchemy.
  5. (countable, Britain) A heater or range used instead of an actual fireplace (similar to an electrical fireplace).
  6. (countable) The weather needed to start out a fireplace.

    The fireplace was laid and wanted to be lit.

  7. (uncountable) The bullets or different projectiles fired from a gun.

    The fireplace from the enemy weapons saved us from attacking.

  8. Energy of ardour, whether or not love or hate.
    • 1687, Francis Atterbury, An Reply to some Issues, the Spirit of Martin Luther and the Authentic of the Reformation
      He had fireplace in his mood.
  9. Liveliness of creativeness or fancy; mental and ethical enthusiasm.
  10. Splendour; brilliancy; lustre; therefore, a star.
    • c. 1606, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Macbeth”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Revealed In line with the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, revealed 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act I, scene iv]:

      Stars, conceal your fires.

  11. A extreme trial; something inflaming or frightening.
  12. Purple coloration in a chunk of opal.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived phrases[edit]
Descendants[edit]
Translations[edit]

See fireplace/translations § Noun.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Center English firen, fyren, furen, from Outdated English fȳrian (to make a fireplace), from the noun (see above). Cognate with Outdated Frisian fioria (to gentle a fireplace), Saterland Frisian fjuurje (to fireside), Center Dutch vûren, vueren, vieren (to set fireplace), Dutch vuren (to fireside, shoot), Outdated Excessive German fiuren (to ignite, set on fireplace), German feuern (to fireside).

Verb[edit]

fireplace (third-person singular easy current fires, current participle firing, easy previous and previous participle fired)

  1. (transitive) To set (one thing, typically a constructing) on fireplace.
    • 1897, H[erbert] G[eorge] Wells, “On the Home in Nice Portland Road”, in The Invisible Man: A Grotesque Romance, New York, N.Y.; London: Harper & Brothers Publishers, OCLC 904345282, web page 186:

      [“]Then I slipped up once more with a field of matches, fired my heap of paper and garbage, put the chairs and bedding thereby, led the fuel to the affair, by way of an india-rubber tube, and waving a farewell to the room left it for the final time.”
      “You fired the home!” exclaimed Kemp.
      Fired the home. It was the one technique to cowl my path – and little question it was insured.[“]

    • 1887, H. Rider Haggard, She: A Historical past of Journey[1]:

      That lamp was the mother of a girl tied to a stout stake let into the rock, and he had fired her hair.

    • 1907, Jack London, The Iron Heel
      It was lengthy a query of debate, whether or not the burning of the South Facet ghetto was unintended, or whether or not it was executed by the Mercenaries; however it’s positively settled now that the ghetto was fired by the Mercenaries below orders from their chiefs.
  2. (transitive) To warmth as with fireplace, however with out setting on fireplace, as ceramic, metallic objects, and many others.

    In case you fireplace the pottery at too excessive a temperature, it might crack.

    They fireplace the wooden to make it simpler to place some extent on the tip.

    • So this was my future dwelling, I assumed! Definitely it made a courageous image. I had seen comparable ones fired-in on many a Heidelberg stein. Backed by towering hills, [] a sky of palest Gobelin flecked with fats, fleecy little clouds, it in fact appeared a pricey little metropolis; town of 1’s desires.
  3. (transitive) To drive away by setting a fireplace.
  4. (transitive) To terminate the employment contract of (an worker), particularly for trigger (similar to misconduct or poor efficiency).
    Antonym: rent
    • 1969, Vladimir Nabokov, Ada or Ardor, Penguin 2011, p.226:
      The primary, apparent alternative was hysterical and incredible Blanche – had there not been her timidity, her concern of being ‘fired [].
  5. (transitive) To shoot (a gun or analogous machine).

    We are going to fireplace our weapons on the enemy.

    He fired his radar gun at passing vehicles.

  6. (transitive, mining) To set off an explosive in a mine.
    • 1887, H. Rider Haggard, She: A Historical past of Journey[2]:

      `Now are you each prepared?’ I stated, as folks do when they will fireplace a mine.

  7. (intransitive) To shoot a gun, cannon, or comparable weapon.
    Synonyms: open fireplace, shoot

    Do not fireplace till you see the whites of their eyes.

  8. (transitive, sports activities) To shoot; to aim to attain a aim.
  9. (intransitive, physiology) To trigger an motion potential in a cell.

    When a neuron fires, it transmits data.

  10. (transitive) To forcibly direct (one thing).

    He answered the questions the reporters fired at him.

  11. (transitive, intransitive, pc sciences, software program engineering) To provoke an occasion (by way of an occasion handler).

    The occasion handler ought to solely fireplace in any case internet web page content material has completed loading.

    The queue fires a job each time the thread pool is able to deal with it.

  12. To inflame; to annoy, because the passions.

    to fireplace the soul with anger, pleasure, or revenge

  13. To animate; to provide life or spirit to.

    to fireplace the genius of a younger man

  14. To feed or serve the hearth of.

    to fireplace a boiler

    • 1961 March, “Balmore”, “Driving and firing fashionable French steam locomotives”, in Trains Illustrated, pages 150, 151:

      We left with the “Blue Prepare”, lifeless on time. This time I fired all the best way. [] The subsequent day took me dwelling once more on No. E.16 with Henri Dutertre. I fired from Paris to Calais.

  15. (transitive) To gentle up as if by fireplace; to light up.
    • c. 1593, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedy of Richard the Third: []”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Revealed In line with the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, revealed 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act III, scene ii]:

      [The sun] fires the proud tops of the jap pines.

  16. (transitive, farriery) To cauterize.
  17. (intransitive, dated) To catch fireplace; to be kindled.
  18. (intransitive, dated) To be irritated or infected with ardour.
    • 1864, Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu, Uncle Silas:

      Inexperienced woman as I used to be, I fired on the concept of changing into his dupe, and fancying, maybe, that there was extra in merely answering his observe than it will have amounted to, I stated — “That type of factor might reply very properly with button-makers, however women do not prefer it. []

Synonyms[edit]
  • (set on fireplace): See set on fireplace
  • (transitive, shoot): let off, unfastened (archery), shoot
  • (terminate the employment of): dehire, dismiss, give one’s playing cards, give the boot, give the elbow, give the previous heave-ho, let go, make redundant, sack, terminate, throw out, unhire; See additionally Thesaurus:lay off.
Derived phrases[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations under have to be checked and inserted above into the suitable translation tables, eradicating any numbers. Numbers don’t essentially match these in definitions. See directions at Wiktionary:Entry structure § Translations.

Etymology 3[edit]

(This etymology is lacking or incomplete. Please add to it, or focus on it on the Etymology scriptorium.)

Various types[edit]

  • fye (nonstandard, Web slang)

Adjective[edit]

fireplace (not comparable)

  1. (slang) Wonderful; wonderful.

    That shit is fireplace, yo!

Translations[edit]

Additional studying[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Verb[edit]

fireplace

  1. third-person singular current indicative of firir

Crimean Tatar[edit]

Noun[edit]

fireplace

  1. shrinkage, loss
  2. scrap

Etymology 1[edit]

From Outdated Norse fjórir, from Proto-Germanic *fedwōr, from Proto-Indo-European *kʷetwóres (4).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /fiːrə/, [ˈfiːɐ]

Numeral[edit]

fireplace

  1. 4
Utilization notes[edit]

In compounds: fir-.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Center Low German fīren, from French virer (bear, veer).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /fiːrə/, [ˈfiːɐ]

Verb[edit]

fireplace (crucial fir, infinitive at fireplace, current tense firer, previous tense firede, good tense har firet)

  1. to decrease one thing mounted to a rope or one thing comparable
    • 1871, Jens Andreas Friis, Lappisk Mythologi, web page 138
      Saa gik han hen og firede Stenen og Vidietouget ned i Hullet.

      Then he went [to the hole] and lowered the rock and the wicker rope down into the opening.
    • 2014, Teddy Vork, Diget, Tellerup A/S →ISBN
      Han satte sig på knæ, famlede sig frem til tovet og vendte sig rundt så han havde ryggen til hullet, drejede overkroppen bagud, firede faklen ned i hullet.

      He kneeled, fumbled his technique to the rope and rotated, such that his again was to the opening, twisted his torso backwards, lowered the torch into the opening.
Conjugation[edit]

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin fierī (to turn into, be), current energetic infinitive of fiō. Evaluate Romanian fi.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈfi.re/, [ˈfiːr̺e]
  • Hyphenation: fì‧re

Verb[edit]

fireplace

  1. (northern Italy, out of date) to be
    Synonym: essere

Utilization notes[edit]

  • The one types attested exterior of historical Northern Italian literature are the longer term fia (third-person singular) and fiano (third-person plural).

References[edit]

  • fireplace in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell’Enciclopedia Italiana

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Danish fireplace, Outdated Norse fjórir, from Proto-Germanic *fedwōr, from *kʷetwṓr, the neuter type of Proto-Indo-European *kʷetwóres.

Pronunciation[edit]

Numeral[edit]

fireplace

  1. 4
Derived phrases[edit]
Associated phrases[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From French virer, by way of Center Low German firen

Verb[edit]

fireplace (crucial fir, current tense firer, passive fires, easy previous fira or firet or firte, previous participle fira or firet or firt, current participle firende)

  1. to slacken, ease
  2. to decrease (a flag)

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Outdated Norse fjórir, by way of Danish fireplace.

Numeral[edit]

fireplace

  1. 4
Derived phrases[edit]
Associated phrases[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From French virer, by way of Center Low German firen.

Verb[edit]

fireplace

  1. to slacken, ease
  2. to decrease (a flag)

References[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

fireplace n

  1. plural of fir

Etymology 2[edit]

From fi +‎ -re.

Noun[edit]

fireplace f (plural firi)

  1. essence, substance, nature
    Synonym: natură
  2. character, mood, disposition
    Synonyms: caracter, temperament
  3. thoughts
    Synonym: minte
Declension[edit]
Associated phrases[edit]

Turkish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Greek Φύρα (Fýra)

Noun[edit]

fireplace (particular accusative fireyi, plural fireler)

  1. wastage
  2. outage
  3. shrinkage, loss, loss in weight, lower
  4. turnover
  5. ullage
  6. leakage
  7. waste, tret, deficiency

Declension[edit]

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