record – Wiktionary

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Center English, borrowed from Outdated French report, from recorder. See report (verb).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

report (plural information)

  1. An merchandise of knowledge put into a brief or everlasting bodily medium.
    • 2012 March-April, John T. Jost, “Social Justice: Is It in Our Nature (and Our Future)?”, in American Scientist[1], quantity 100, quantity 2, web page 162:

      He attracts eclectically on research of baboons, descriptive anthropological accounts of hunter-gatherer societies and, in a couple of instances, the fossil report.

    The particular person had a report of the interview so she might overview her notes.

    The vacationer’s images and the tape of the police name present a report of the crime.

  2. Any occasion of a bodily medium on which info was put for the aim of preserving it and making it out there for future reference.
    Synonym: log

    We’ve got no report of you making this fee to us.

  3. Ellipsis of phonograph report: a disc, normally created from vinyl, on which sound is recorded and could also be replayed on a phonograph.
    Synonyms: disc, phonograph report, vinyl

    I nonetheless like information higher than CDs.

  4. (computing) A set of knowledge regarding a single particular person or merchandise.
  5. Essentially the most excessive recognized worth of some variable, notably that of an achievement in aggressive occasions.

    The warmth and humidity had been each new information.

    The group set a brand new report for many factors scored in a recreation.

Hyponyms[edit]
Derived phrases[edit]
Associated phrases[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Center English recorden (to repeat, to report), borrowed from Outdated French recorder (to get by coronary heart), from Latin recordārī, current lively infinitive of recordor (bear in mind, bring to mind), from re- (again, once more) + cor (coronary heart; thoughts).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

report (third-person singular easy current information, current participle recording, easy previous and previous participle recorded)

  1. (transitive) To make a report of knowledge.
    I needed to report each element of what occurred, for the advantage of future generations.
    • 2012 September 7, Phil McNulty, “Moldova 0-5 England”, in BBC Sport[2]:

      The show and consequence should be positioned within the context that was it was towards a aspect that seemed each bit their Fifa world rating of 141 – however England accomplished the job with effectivity to report their greatest away win in 19 years.

  2. (transitive) To make an audio or video recording of.
    Inside per week they’d recorded each the music and the video for it.
    • 2014 June 29, Adam Sherwin, “UK cinemas ban Google glasses over piracy danger”, in The Unbiased[3]:

      Nonetheless, the flexibility to report folks with out their data, with the stroke of a finger over the spectacle body or a voice command, has prompted privateness considerations.

  3. (transitive, legislation) To offer authorized standing to by making an official public report.
    When the deed was recorded, we formally owned the home.
  4. (intransitive) To repair in a medium, normally in a tangible medium.
  5. (intransitive) To make an audio, video, or multimedia recording.
  6. (transitive, intransitive, out of date) To repeat; to follow.
  7. (transitive, intransitive, out of date) To sing or repeat a tune.
    • 1595, George Peele, The Outdated Wives’ Story, The Malone Society Reprints, 1908, strains 741-742,[4]
      Come Berecynthia, let vs in likewise,
      And heare the Nightingale report hir notes.
    • 1600, Edward Fairfax (translator), Godfrey of Bulloigne, or The Recouerie of Ierusalem by Torquato Tasso, London: I. Iaggard and M. Lownes, E-book 2, p. 39,[5]
      They lengthy’d to see the day, to heare the larke
      File her hymnes and chant her carols blest,
    • c. 1608, William Shakespeare, Pericles, Prince of Tyre, Act IV, Prologue,[6]
      [] to the lute
      She sung, and made the night-bird mute,
      That also information with moan;
    • 1616, William Browne, Britannia’s Pastorals, London: John Haviland, 1625, E-book 2, Track 4, p. 129,[7]
      [] the Nymph did earnestly contest
      Whether or not the Birds or she recorded greatest []
  8. (out of date) To mirror; to ponder.
    • 1655, Thomas Fuller, The Church-Historical past of Britain from the Delivery of Jesus Christ till the 12 months M.DC.XLVIII, London: John Williams, E-book 5, Part 3, web page 204,[8]
      [] he was [] carried to the Scaffold on the Tower-hill [] , himself praying all the way in which, and recording upon the phrases which he earlier than had learn.
Derived phrases[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

  • (make a report of knowledge): erase
  • (make an audio or video recording of): erase
Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

report m (plural information)

  1. reminiscence, recollection of occasions
  2. memento

See additionally[edit]


Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

report n (plural information, diminutive recordje n)

  1. report

Etymology[edit]

From English report.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

report m (plural information)

  1. report (most excessive recognized worth of some achievement)
    Le report du saut en hauteur a été battu par Javier Sotomayor en 1993.

Additional studying[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English report.

Noun[edit]

report m (invariable)

  1. report (sporting achievement; pc knowledge aspect)

Additional studying[edit]

  • report in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell’Enciclopedia Italiana

Portuguese[edit]

Noun[edit]

report m (plural information)

  1. Various type of recorde

Adjective[edit]

report (invariable, comparable)

  1. Various type of recorde

Spanish[edit]

Noun[edit]

report m (plural information)

  1. Misspelling of récord.
  2. report

Etymology[edit]

From English report.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

report f (plural recordiau, not mutable)

  1. report

Derived phrases[edit]

Additional studying[edit]

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–current) , “report”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru On-line (in Welsh), College of Wales Centre for Superior Welsh & Celtic Research

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